Blog – Page 27 – PresenceLearning

It’s Day 4 of our “12 Days of Speech” activities campaign  and we have a fun one! Whether your child is a fan of the Green Lantern (or you or your spouse is a fan of Ryan Reynolds) this game of minimal pairs will be entertaining to say the least. Grade Levels: Pre-K – 3rd Grade Lesson Focus: Practice W/L What You Need: Green Lantern Minimal Pair Cards Green Lantern Cards Glue Laminator Activity Preparation: Step 1: Print out 1-2 sets of minimal pair cards. Step 2: Print out 3-6 sets of Green Lantern cards. Step 3: Cut into rectangles and glue the Green Lantern sides onto the backs of the minimal pair sides (so kids cannot see through). Step 4: Laminate the cards Directions (How to Play!): Use…

For Day 3 of our “12 Days of Speech” we have a fun activity that will help your child learn basic decoding while helping you clean up your Christmas tree. This activity was created for students to work on basic decoding in addition to practicing their articulation sounds. It was made specifically for kids that have a lateral lisp and it is impacting their reading skills. Therefore, basic CVC or CCVC words with /s/, /sh/, or /ch/ are positioned on the ornaments. They have to first work on decoding the words, then use the correct articulation and lastly sort them on to the appropriate tree by sound. Grade Levels: 1st – 5th Grades What You Need: Ornament Sort Sheets (Download here) Directions: Step 1: Let your child know that the slashes around the letter in the stars on top of the trees (i.e.: /s/) means that we are listening for that sound, not necessarily the letter. This starts to make sense especially with /sh/ and /ch/ since some kids have trouble saying the sound they look like. Step 2: Let your child know you want them to first blend the word to figure out what it says and when they repeat the…

It’s the night of Christmas and Santa needs your help to go his sleigh by answering some fun wh- questions. Parents, lead your child along this great board game from Speech Time Fun!          What You Need:  Wh-Questions Christmas Board! (It’s a google doc) Directions:  This game is very simple! Start at the beginning and ask your child each wh- question to help Santa get to his sleigh. The goal isn’t just to help Santa but to help your child learn the wh- sounds. Feel free to take turns This freebie comes from Speech Time Fun! The lady behind this fantastic blog is known as “Miss Speechie”  and is a passionate SLP that works in public schools. Make sure to check her…

Today is the first day of our “12 Days of Speech” event where for the next 12 days we will be uploading our favorite speech therapy activities that parents can do with their kids during their break from school. Along the way, we will be spotlighting some our favorite SLP and mommy bloggers. Be sure to stay tuned on our blog! SPIN THE CHRISTMAS WHEEL! Grade Level: Preschool –K What You Need: 8 Clothespins 2 Christmas Objects Wheel Sheets (Download here) Card Stock (for Christmas Wheel Sheets) Directions (Activity Preparation) Step 1: The first thing you need to do is download the Christmas Objects worksheets onto card stock paper. This paper will help it last longer which means more fun times ahead. Step 2: Once you have the Christmas Objects sheets printed, cut the wheel accordingly by following the circle shape lines surrounding the objects. Step 3 (Optional): To help your child ease into the activity, consider writing numbers on each of the clothespin and have him or her count each one before they activity (this also will help parents keep everything in place. Directions (Activity Time!) Now it’s time to play! There are various different ways to use the…

Whether your child is preparing for a 3-week vacation from school or new to live online speech therapy, your home must not only act as a comfort zone but a classroom. With the holidays coming up, the challenge of keeping your child learning is very important, especially if they are in speech therapy. Consistency is one of the keys to achieving IEP goals. Even if your home doesn’t have much space to spare, there are a couple of simply and imaginative solutions that parents can follow. Here are some tips for parents to help them create an inspiring home classroom: Your student’s learning area can really be learning areas—What about spreading out to small areas in a few rooms? You can set up the computer in one room and a desk in another. This minimizes the space you need to dedicate in any one room, and the change in scenery will help refresh your student during long periods of study. The learning area doesn’t even have to be a “room”—What about turning a closet into your student’s working space area? A spare closet makes for a great all-in-one desk and organization solution. Get some plywood and 2×4’s, attach them securely…

Parent-Teacher conferences are often the first chance parents and teachers have to sit down and discuss goals and objectives for the school year. The following tips from CNN’s Schools of Thought blog will help you establish a working relationship with your child’s teacher. 1. Come Prepared Parents and teachers should go into the conference prepared. For teachers, this means having a student’s information on hand, as well as any questions they have for the parent. For parents, this means talking to your child prior to the meeting to see what his or her issues are and bringing a list of questions in order to address these issues. 2. Work Together It may be difficult to bring up issues to teachers, but creating a positive tone up front may make it easier. The National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) suggests that parents start off the conversation by complimenting the teacher on things he or she seem to be doing well. Once you discuss the issue, brainstorm ways you and the teacher can solve the issue together to maintain the positive tone. 3. Update Your Teacher Parents often overlook the impact life outside of school can have on their child’s in-school performance. Be…

In a recent poll of 1,000 adults across on the country about their views on education, 57% said “it’s very important” that Congress protects funds for programs serving students with disabilities. In comparison to prekindergarten, college financial aid and programs helping school districts with large numbers of students living in poverty, special education programs surpassed all these other education programs with an astounding amount of public support.  The poll was conducted on behalf of the Committee for Education Funding and the Foundation for Education Investment. This January, the White House estimates that special education programs are estimated to lose more than $1 billion under a plan set in place after lawmakers failed to reach a budget deal last year. For parents, this means there may be a time when you question your child’s school’s ability to provide proper special education services. Now is time for parents to weight out different special education options besides traditional school. These options may not only have more resources to help your child but an option such as live online speech therapy can allow you to be part of your child’s learning experience. Leave us your thoughts below in the comments.  Source: Disability Scoop

The first half of the school year is coming to an end. As a parent of a student with learning disabilities, your first concern may be to check on child’s progress in special education. For example, if your child is in speech therapy, has their been improvement in their articulation? One way for parents to understand if their child is making strides is through quarterly reports mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA). Unfortunately, these progress reports don’t really provide specific details that are enough for a parent to trust their child is making progress or not. So, if you’re a parent of a child with learning disabilities, you’re probably thinking: “What can I do if I don’t think my child is “making expected progress” toward IEP goals?” There are a couple of things: Request The School’s Initial Comprehensive Evaluation of Your Child Right at the moment your child was being considered for special education placement, the school conducted an evaluation. In this evaluation, there were several parts including your child’s work samples, achievement tests and more. Make sure you have a copy of this evaluation and read over this document again. As you look over everything,…

When it comes to raising a child with disabilities, the parenting style that a mom or dad adopts is key, according to a new study. Last month, a new studying on parenting released by Brigham Young University reported that a child with disabilities raised by a positive parent is more likely to be independent and confident than a child under an authoritative parent. Tim Smith, Chair of the Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education at Brigham Young University, says, “In households where positive parenting is applied, the symptoms and severity of the child’s disability are more likely to decrease over time.” For new parents especially, the choice of whether a “nurturing mom” or the “strict dad” will be the best parent for your child is a haunting decision. The BYU study recognizes that parents of children with disabilities will be tempted to take an authoritative approach. However, according to Tim Smith, “research has consistently shown that the earlier and more consistently positive parenting is provided, the greater the child’s development.” Source: Disability Scoop For more tips on how parents can help their child learn at home, check out this infographic: “3 Speech Therapy Tips To Make Sure Your Child Gets…

The recent US News & World Report article “Two High School Teachers May Be Better Than One” explores the world of co-teaching in today’s classroom. Susan Fitzell, an education consultant, says the key to success is in the implementation. In order to co-teach effectively, both teachers must interact with students in small groups to ensure that each student is receiving individual instruction. If a group of students needs additional help within a lesson, one teacher can aid them while the other leads the rest of the class, allowing students with different learning speeds to interact within the same classroom. Co-teaching promotes collaboration during the planning process and lets teachers split disciplinary and classroom management responsibilities. With PresenceLearning’s online speech therapy, a remote speech and language pathologist (SLP) can collaborate, or co-teach, with an on-site SLP or paraprofessional. Through this online platform, both educators and parents can be involved with a student’s progress.  How is your school or colleagues using co-teaching in the classroom? Share your stories with us on Facebook or Twitter. Read more: US News & World Report  

© 2017. All Rights Reserved. | PresenceLearning makes live, online special education related services available to K-12 students around the country — and world. As the leader in the delivery of clinical services via the web, PresenceLearning has provided over one million sessions of speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, behavioral interventions and mental health services, assessments, and early childhood services.