Blog – Page 30 – PresenceLearning

With the Veterans Day this past Sunday, we recognize the armed services protecting our country from harm around the world. There is no question that these Americans are heroes. But what we also must remember is that many of these Americans are parents, aunts, uncles, and grand parents with families praying for their safety every day. For an armed service man or woman to have to serve their duty while leaving a child at home with their spouse or guardian is an unforeseeable challenge many have to face. From the last government audit (GAO) study conducted by the Department of Defense, it was found that over 1.5 million of the military personnel across all branches had at least one child. Another key insight from the data shows that there are at least 100,000 to 125,000 [military] children who have disabilities of some sort. To the parent or guardian left at home with the astounding duty of raising a child with special needs, please know you’re not alone. Here are some ways to help your child cope with a loved deployed: Share your emotions, but don’t overdo it. It’s OK to let your child know you miss your spouse. But it…

Tomorrow is Election Day. If you’re still undecided about which candidate is right for you, you are not alone. What is important is that you as a voter make an informed decision whether you’d like to see President Obama or Governor Romney as the next President of the United States based on their respective stances on issues you care about. If you’re a parent of a special needs child, one of those issues may be in the realm of education. Today, special education is a major component of a candidate’s education plan with schools taking the burden of providing quality teaching to students with special needs and struggling along the way. What is not surprising is that neither President Obama nor Governor Romney provide a clear cut way to deal with special education. It was either under the guises of several education initiatives or intertwined in other areas such as early education and technology innovation in schools. Last month, Alyson Klein of EducationWeek attended the Republican National Convention and Democratic National Convention and spoke with NPR on each candidate’s respective stance on special education. While taking information on each candidate’s historical moves, we have created a comparison chart below. This…

As cities in the East Coast start to recover from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, many people are still searching for loved ones or trying to see if their home is safe to live in. Imagine being a parent of a young child with autism and finding out your home has been destroyed. Medical information and prescriptions are unsalvageable and your child only has a certain amount left for upcoming doses. Unfortunately, this is a reality for many victims hit by Hurricane Sandy. Though the news can offer warnings for nearing natural disasters, it is important that parents and families do not wait until the last minute to prepare a disaster kit. Especially if you’re a parent a child with special needs, a disaster kit requires more than items of food and water. Here are some key items to include in your family disaster kit: Medications – Make sure to have enough to last week with dosage information. Medical Records & Insurance Information – Also Names and contact information for medical providers and personal support assistants. Contact Information for Hosts – Make sure to establish contact with a family member of friend to stay in their home during the…

Despite initiatives to recruit and retain qualified professionals, districts nationwide are experiencing shortages of speech and language pathologist (SLP). To help administrators and educators recognize the reasons for the shortages and how to cope with them,PresenceLearning, the leading provider of live online speech therapy for schools, is hosting a free webinar titled “Understanding and Managing the Growing SLP Shortage” on Thursday, November 8th at 1:00 pm ET (10:00 am PT). To register for the webinar, visithttps://pages.presencelearning.com/spedahead7. During the webinar, Cathy Bacon, M.A., CCC-SLP, Clinical Professor at Arizona State University, and Karen Roth, M.S., CCC-SLP, Clinical Associate Professor at Arizona State University, will discuss their insights on the reasons for the shortage, as well as what districts can do to ensure that students receive the services they need. The panelists will share creative short- and long-term strategies to battle the SLP shortage and its effect on districts. By attending the webinar, participants will learn: The differences between classroom teacher recruitment/retention and speech-language pathology recruitment/retention needs. The reasons for the speech-language pathologist shortages related to information in the 2011 ASHA Schools Survey. The updated state recruitment strategies for attracting and retaining speech-language pathologists in school settings. The long- and short-term strategies for…

Halloween is only a couple of days away and this year it falls right smack in the middle of the school week. If you’re a teacher or SLP, the challenge is keeping your students learning while making sure they’re having fun. After all, how can you teach seriously with a classroom full of students dressed up as vampires and Transformers? Luckily, we found a couple of ideas for speech and language activities from Katie, an SLP from Playing With Words 365, that are not only educational but exciting. Here are some of our favorites: Halloween Bingo What better way to use Halloween candy than as a bingo marker? Make sure to tailor the call outs for the game based on current classroom lessons. For example, if your kids are working on “wh” questions, incorporate some related vocabulary words into the Bingo game. Also, if your students are working on syntax, have them formulate sentences using these vocabulary words. Scarecrow Memory According to Katie, the Scarecrow Memory game is a fun activity that will help students work on color recognition and memory skills. To download the scarecrows, visit Preschool Printables and for fun, they have them in different colors. Dominos By…

It’s what every parent dreads. Furlough days. “Teacher In Service Days”. Regardless of what they are called, these are days where you are asked to keep your special needs child at home for most or all of the day. Special needs children need a consistent schedule and explaining why your child cannot go to school on any given day during the week can be a challenge. Equally challenging: figuring out how to use the extra time you will spend together, so its time well spent.   Here are 4 ways parents can help their child learn at home: Talk to Your Child Most parents think they do this, but in most cases, conversations with child turn into mini-lectures that bore them. Start by asking simple questions about their lives to gauge their interests, dreams and passions. Be prepared at some point for your child to clam up. Clamming up is a signal that’s it’s time for you as a parent to shift gears to a new topic or activity for you two to engage in. Practice “de-schooling” Help your child free up large blocks of time. Depending on their age, aim for them each to have a full day and…

Bullying is an issue that has plagued schools for years. With recent movements to stop bullying receiving media attention in storyline son hit shows like “Glee” and viral videos featuring young Hollywood, it would be easy to conclude that the problem is being addressed. However, in a recent study by the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, findings show that this is not the case. In the report released Monday, researchers found that roughly half of adolescents with autism, intellectual disability, speech impairments and learning disabilities have been subject to a bullying episode at school, a rate that is significantly higher than students not receiving special education services. How do we make bullying go away? Researchers believe that it is up to schools to do more to “promote an accepting environment.” Schools have responded by implementing anti-bullying programs. We applaud this effort. But many school systems simply don’t have the funds to put in place a formal anti-bullying program. What’s the alternative? We propose that schools and parents start reducing bullying with this three-part approach: 1. Start with the Students Who Are the Most Likely to Be Bullied First, because the highest incidence of bullying is among special needs population, recognize that…

How to get the most from your investment in speech therapy – an infographic provided by PresenceLearning. (Click the infographic to get a better view) Embed This Graphic On Your Site! Infographic by PresenceLearning, The Leader in Online Speech Therapy

For any parent, dealing with the IEP (Individual Education Plan) is a sensitive and intimidating task. The biggest challenge that parents face is making sure they are building an IEP that fits with their child – in terms of comfort level, abilities, and age. To make sure you are well prepared, start asking yourself these questions: What’s an IEP (Individual Education Plan)? Though it may sound simple, understanding what an IEP is and why your child needs it is a vital first step. An IEP is a plan developed by parents, educators, and other team members (discussed later) that set outs educational goals set for a child with special needs during the school year, as well as any special support your child is expected to require to achieve them. Has My Child Been Assessed? After parents decide that their child may need special education, the next step is to get assessed by the school district to confirm the student is qualified and where they should be placed. Once the assessment is completed a parent can meet with the person who administered the assessment to provide a copy of the comprehensive evaluation report (CER) and discuss their child’s goals days before…

High school is a completely different ball game compared to elementary and middle school. At this point in their lives, children are becoming teenagers and want independence and control over their time, especially time spent outside of school. If your child has special needs, the challenges may be different.  Help your teenager focus on first making a good transition into high school and – with that as a basis – expect their focus to shift to time spent outside of school. Here are 15 ways to make sure your child transitions with ease into high school: Plan a pre-transition meeting with your child’s middle school IEP team and high school special education to determine if the high school special education program will be able to provide your child with the learning environment that they need to be a successful student Attend planning meetings for choosing high school courses with your child. Ask your child about her goals for high school and after high school. Listen. Help your child set high and realistic goals. Tell your child about your hopes for his future. Ask the school for information and a school handbook prior to the beginning of the year. This should be…

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. | PresenceLearning makes live, online special education related services available to K-12 students around the country — and world. As the leader in the delivery of clinical services via the web, PresenceLearning has provided over one million sessions of speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, behavioral interventions and mental health services, assessments, and early childhood services.