Virtually Speaking: A Teletherapy Blog for Clinicians, by Clinicians – Page 2 – PresenceLearning

So much to read, so little time! Check out this month’s list of some of the more noteworthy articles we’ve come across. Poor sleep: A powerful — but often ignored — culprit in learning – A look at what both parents and educators can do about a child’s sleep issues, and how they can affect an IEP (Multibriefs) The Gap Between The Science On Kids And Reading, And How It Is Taught – The disconnect between the way children are taught to read, and the way speech and language develops in the brain. (NPR) How to Keep Students with Disabilities Safe in Lockdowns, Evacuations, and Other School Crises – Learn about the Individual Emergency and Lockdown Plan, which is designed to blend seamlessly with a student’s IEP. (Friendship Circle) How to Motivate (Not…

We all know how a poor night’s sleep impacts us the next day: difficulty paying attention, crankiness, and brain fog are just some of the typical reactions we may feel. Children who suffer from sleep deficiency may also misbehave, have trouble reading emotions, and perform poorly in academics. And when a student also has special needs, sleep problems can impede the work of the critical interventions and therapy that helps students to succeed. Therefore, it is important for schools and parents alike to watch for signs of sleep deprivation, address the conditions that lead to poor sleep, and even potentially collaborate with a physician or psychologist to assess medical or psychological components of the problem. In a recent Multibriefs article, Howard Margolis suggests that parents…

So much to read, so little time! Check out this month’s list of some of the more noteworthy articles we’ve come across. Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf children – A study between the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago developed an algorithm based on brain scans that predicts language ability in children who have received cochlear implants. (Medical Xpress) Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation in Students – Recognizing improvement, creating opportunities for service learning, and tapping into strengths and interests are just a few ways to help children develop intrinsic motivation. (Edutopia) New Research Finds Animals May Help Kids On The Spectrum – While the research continues to grow on the efficacy and long term results of animal-assisted interventions, families continue…

Welcome to 2018! The year is already proving newsworthy in research, policy, interventions, and more. Here’s what’s been on our radar so far: Common pain reliever use during pregnancy linked to language delay in girls – A study by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that girls born to mothers with a high use of acetaminophen were nearly six times more likely to experience language delays than girls born to mothers with low or no use. (Science Daily) Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among US Children and Adolescents, 2014-2016 – Three years of data show a stabilization in autism rates. (The JAMA Network) Telehealth Targets a Niche in Mental Health Care for Urban Youths – Pediatricians are now turning to telehealth for training and consultations…

In a recent 90-minute webinar with PresenceLearning, an audience member asked Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson, an expert on differentiated instruction, how to get buy-in from teachers for differentiated instruction, especially among more seasoned teachers. See Dr. Tomlinson’s response below. You can get teacher buy-in in a lot of ways, just like you do with kids. Ask yourself how you get the most reluctant kids to join you. In a classroom, that’s with a relationship. It might not always be a cuddly relationship to start with, but it can at least be honest where you can say something like, “I know of three kids here who would really benefit if we could figure out a way together to do something a little bit different for them. Are…

In a recent 90-minute webinar with PresenceLearning, an audience member wondered whether special educators are used by gen ed teachers and administrators to avoid school-wide differentiation, and asked Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson, an expert on differentiated instruction, how they can become part of the solution. See Dr. Tomlinson’s response below. I love this question. You could substitute the notion of special education in there, or special programs for the gifted, or remedial settings for reading. The big question is, why don’t we just put all those kids in a room where they belong, and then we won’t have to worry about them. The thing we sense as a burden is taken away. Of course, everything in life depends on the lens through which you look at it. I…

In a recent 90-minute webinar with PresenceLearning, an audience member asked Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson, an expert on differentiated instruction, how educators can differentiate instruction in overcrowded, underfunded public schools with highly diverse classrooms. According to Dr. Tomlinson, it all starts with taking the first step. This really is the question of the universe. It really doesn’t matter where you are —what country, what kind of school. Everyone has the sense that so much is coming at them: too many kids, too many needs, too few dollars, too little time, and they just feel they can’t do it. Dr. Tomlinson recalled an educator from New York who had been teaching for 60 years. This educator had shared information about the complexity of schools in New York and the challenges…

In a recent 90-minute webinar with PresenceLearning, an audience member asked Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson, an expert on differentiated instruction, how SLPs and other clinical professionals can best partner with teachers. Here’s what Dr. Tomlinson had to say about this common pain point faced by both clinical professionals and special education teachers. Tip 1: Choose Your Allies Clinicians all have numerous teachers with whom they need to work and on whom they need to make an impact. If you are not careful, you can find yourself running from one to the other all day long, and by the end of the day, you will hardly remember where you were because you couldn’t stay in anyone’s classroom for longer than 15 or 30 minutes. Think strategically about these teachers.…

Starting this month, we will list a selection of some of the most widely read and topical articles and resources that have come across our clinical radar. Reading for Understanding in ASD – A question and answer session with Dr. Shari Robertson on how to facilitate reading comprehension for students with autism. (The ASHA Leader) Make the Speech Referral Process Work for You – Practical ideas for streamlining the referral process and fostering better relationships with school staff. The growing demand for early childhood education – The importance of design in early learning centers. (Building Design + Construction) Clients Describe How Occupational Therapy Changed Their Lives in Video – People of different ages and with different disabilities describe what occupational therapy has meant to them. (AOTA) Scientists to Schools: Social, Emotional Development Crucial for Learning – 28 nationally recognized researchers released a statement on the link between social and emotional development to academics and an agenda for future research. Can Preschool Really Narrow Achievement Gaps? – A new study of over 12,000 students across 11 states found quality gaps in preschools between states as well as between preschools with low-income and minority populations compared to preschools with higher income, white populations. Multitasking Harms Recall—Music, Not So Much –…

Starting this month, we will list a selection of some of the most widely read and topical articles and resources that have come across our clinical radar. What was on your reading list this month? Please share your best below in the Comments. Intervention strategies evolve in K12: New approaches address social-emotional learning and anxiety as well as academic instruction – School districts have implemented RTI and PBIS for over a decade. Learnings over this period, combined with a better understanding of the neuroscience behind learning and new technology have led educators to further refine intervention strategies. This article outlines four new approaches to intervention. (From District Administration) Education Department Launches New IDEA Website – Based on feedback from educators, administrators, parents, service providers, and advocates, the US Department…

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