caseload

Caseload Management Via Telepractice

We’ve had a lot of questions come in recently asking about how caseload management works in teletherapy. Specifically, we’ve had therapists ask how providers in the PL Care Network get their first assignment and complete all the behind-the-scenes work that goes into getting started with a new caseload. This is the first in a four-part

Changing your lot in life: 4 suggestions to impact caseload size

In our first post on caseload manageability, as proposed by Katz, et al (citation below) in a recent article in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in the Schools, we discussed the identified factors that impact one’s perceptions of her caseload size and those that contribute to job satisfaction. The authors also shared several proposals  to

Caseload manageability and job satisfaction: Comments from the field

In an earlier post, we looked at research presented by Lauren Katz, et al, “What makes a caseload (un)manageable? School-based speech-language pathologists speak” (complete citation follows below), a discussion of the variables impacting a speech pathologist’s perception of the manageability of his caseload. Variables were divided into three (3) distinct categories: demographics: who was more

Git ‘er done: Factors impacting perception of caseload manageability

In a recent LSHSS article by Lauren Katz, et al, “What makes a caseload (un)manageable? School-based speech-language pathologists speak” (complete citation follows below), the authors examined variables that contribute to a clinician’s perception of her ability to enjoy a job well-done. Through an extensive literature search, the authors uncovered a few demographic variables for predicting